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Sandeep Johri

Sandeep Johri

CEO of Tricentis, a company that is "a global leader in enterprise software testing solutions that...
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Apply for 2015-16 WSU Private Scholarships Now!
March 3 2015
http://wayne.edu/scholarships/privateapp/
Apply now for WSU private scholarships for the 2015-16 academic year. The submission deadline for the application and all required materials is March 31, 2015. Not all WSU Private Scholarships require submission of the Private Scholarship Application. If the Private Scholarship Application requirement is not indicated in the description of the scholarship, then only the submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is required. Complete your 2015-16 FAFSA by March 31, 2015 at fafsa.ed.gov. The annual FAFSA is available January 1 for the upcoming year.
"Conversations on Commercialization-Legal Foundations of a Start-up: What You Don't Know May Hurt You"
March 3 2015 at 8:30 AM
5057 Woodward, 6th Floor
This session, "Legal Foundations of a Start-up: What You Don't Know May Hurt You," will feature guest speaker Gary Kendra, J.D., founder of  http://kendralaw.com/.  Gary will provide key insights and discussion on the legal facets of forming a company.   Please join us over breakfast for an informal but insightful discussion! 
Nano@Wayne with Dr. Christine Schmidt, University of Florida
March 3 2015 at 2:30 PM
Welcome Center Auditorium
The Office of the Vice President for Research is pleased to host the next Nano@Wayne Seminar on Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 2:30 p.m. at Wayne State University's Welcome Center Auditorium. The guest presenter will be Dr. Christine Schmidt, chair of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida. She will present,"Engineering Materials for Functional Nerve Regeneration." A reception will immediately follow in the Welcome Center Lobby. The seminar is free; registration is requested. Bio:  Dr. Schmidt is the Pruitt Family Professor and Department Chair of the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida. Dr. Schmidt received her B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 1988 and her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1995. She conducted postdoctoral research at MIT as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow, joining the University of Texas at Austin Chemical Engineering faculty in 1996. She was one of the founding faculty members of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at UT Austin, and was at UT Austin until December 2012, when  she moved to become the chair of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida. Dr. Schmidt is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), and a Fellow of Biomaterials Science and Engineering (FBSE) of the International Union of Societies of Biomaterials Science and Engineering, She is the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Materials Chemistry B and serves on the Editorial Boards for Materials Horizons, Acta Biomaterialia, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer  Edition, International Journal of Nanomedicine, and Nanomedicine. She has received numerous  research, teaching, and advising awards, including the American Competitiveness and Innovation  (ACI) Fellowship from NSF's Division of Materials Research, the Chairmen's Distinguished Life  Sciences Award by the Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce,  a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and a Whitaker Young Investigator Award. Dr. Schmidt's research is focused on developing new biomaterials and biomaterial composites (e.g., natural material scaffolds, processed tissues, electronic polymer composites) that can be used to physically guide and stimulate regenerating nerves. In addition, her group is investigating neuron-electronic interfacing using electrically conducting polymers as a means to ultimatelydevelop new bioprosthetics. Abstract: Damage to spinal cord and peripheral nerve tissue can have a devastating impact on the quality of life for individuals suffering from nerve injuries. Our research is focused on analyzing and designing biomaterials that can interface with neurons and specifically stimulate and guide nerves to regenerate. These biomaterials might be required for facial and hand reconstruction or in trauma cases, and potentially could be used to aid the regeneration of damaged spinal cord.  New technologies to aid nerve regeneration will ultimately require that biomaterials be designed both to physically support tissue growth as well as to elicit desired receptor-specific responses from particular cell types. One way of achieving such interactive biomaterials is with the use of natural-based biomaterials that interact favorable with the body. In particular, our research has focused on developing advanced hyaluronan-based scaffolds that can be used for peripheral and spinal nerve regeneration applications. Hyaluronic acid (HA; also known as hyaluronan) is a non-sulfated, high molecular weight, glycosaminoglycan found in all mammals and is a major component of the extracellular matrix in the nervous system. HA has been shown to play a significant role during embryonic development, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and, most importantly for our purposes, in wound healing and tissue regeneration. HA is a versatile biomaterial that has been used in a number of applications including tissue engineering scaffolds, clinical therapies, and drug delivery devices. Our group has devised novel techniques to process this sugar material into forms that can be used in therapeutic applications. For example, we are using advanced laserbased processes to create "lines" of specific proteins within the hyaluronan materials to provide physical and chemical guidance features for the individual re-growing axons. We have found that these materials facilitate neuron interactions and are thus highly promising for regenerating peripheral and spinal nerves in vivo. In a parallel approach to foster nerve regeneration, our group has developed natural tissue scaffolds termed "acellular tissue grafts" created by chemical processing of normal intact nerve tissue. These grafts are created from natural biological tissue -- human cadaver nerves -- and are chemically processed so that they do not cause an immune response and are therefore not rejected in patients. These grafts have been optimized to maintain the natural intricate architecture of the nerve pathways, and thus, they are ideal for promoting the re-growth of damaged axons across lesions. These engineered, biological nerve grafts are currently used in the clinic for peripheral nerve injuries and are being explored for spinal cord regeneration.
Write Successful NSF CAREER Award Proposals (NSF-Focused)
March 4 2015 at 1:30 PM
Welcome Center
The Office of the Vice President for Research is pleased to offer this research career development award writing seminar for WSU faculty, post-docs, and space permitting, advanced doctoral students on Wednesday, March 4, 2015. The OVPR is sponsoring a major portion of the cost to bring Grant Writers’ Seminars and Workshops to campus to conduct this seminar presented by Dr. Peg AtKisson. Attendance at a Write Winning Grants seminar previously hosted by OVPR is a pre-requisite for this seminar.   The purpose of the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award is to create teacher-scholars – faculty members who will use their research to attract and motivate students to learn better. It is a very prestigious award.  Acquisition of a CAREER Award is particularly distinguishing in the developing career of an assistant professor, which is why so many apply for it – most without success. The principal reason for failure is lack of understanding of what NSF is trying to accomplish with the award, i.e., the purpose of the award, which is what this seminar teaches. Seminar information Write Successful NSF CAREER Award Proposals (NSF-focused) March 4, 2015 – 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Welcome Center Auditorium, 42 W. Warren Registration deadline: February 20, 2015   The fee for seminar is $50 and may be paid by personal check or through a department index account transfer. Payment or index information must be received prior to the seminar to reserve your spot.   Registration is limited! Registration and requested information needs to be completed by February 20, 2015. Attendance at a Write Winning Grants seminar previously hosted by OVPR is a pre-requisite for this seminar. To register, visit events.wayne.edu Please contact sjames@wayne.edu if you have questions.  
Co-op Information Session for WSU Engineering Warriors
March 4 2015 at 2:00 PM
Engineering, College of
If you are seeking an internship or co-op in industry them make sure that you come to a co-op Information Session.
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